Tag Archives: marine

Protect Our Planet

Stand together for science & the protection of our planet.

#ClimateChange is real.

Communication, Collaboration & #ClimateAction is imperative.

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Photo taken by @eslopez128 of me in Masirah Island for the                                                    Maritime Archaeological Survey of Oman.

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Together let’s take educated action & live consciously to preserve our oceans, our planet, our heritage. Join the movement – Parley for the Oceans: https://air.parley.tv/pledge/NzARQD #ParleyAIR

Take the pledge here: http://www.parley.tv/oceanplastic/#parleyair

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Please watch: ‘Parlay for the Oceans’
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Expert Presenter | Past Preservers

Thrilled to share that I am now represented by Past Preservers media agency as an Expert Presenter for documentary/media projects, together with Dr Peter B Campbell and Dr Chloe Duckworth! Thank you Nigel J. Hetherington (Founder & CEO) & Past Preservers team for having me on board!

Great meeting fellow team members at the Past Preservers gathering in LA today! Looking forward to new projects… stay tuned!

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“Past Preservers Expert Presenter Agency; Past Preservers People, is excited to announce that our line-up of presenters has grown with the addition of marine archaeologists Dr Carmen Obied & Dr Peter Campbell & Dr Chloë Duckworth a lecturer in archaeological science.

Carmen is both an underwater archaeologist and international model. Born in Seville, Spain and raised on the seaside in Lisbon, Portugal by her English/Scottish mother and Egyptian/Spanish father – so she can speak 6 languages. She grew up immersed underwater and seeking adventure, eventually awaking her curiosity in exploring the ancient maritime world.

Carmen on archaeology “The world of archaeology continues to inspire – and there is still so much to discover and preserve! By engaging with diverse multilingual audiences in science and education through a combination of research, technology and multimedia, we can inspire the value of cultural-environmental heritage. I have made it my mission to keep bridging gaps between academia and the public – we all deserve access to knowledge! I am excited to join the presenting team at Past Preservers!…”

Read more here: http://pastpreservers.com/our-presenter-agency-now-includes-twenty-world-class-academics/ | http://pastpreservers.com/our-presenters/

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Albania Marine Science Expedition

Albania 2016 Marine Science Expedition

“Expedition finds remains of fortified Roman port are much larger than previously thought”.

Read full article about our recent marine science expedition in Albania, featured on Physics News (Phys.org).


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Update (January): The latest issue of Submerged Heritage is out, with great findings from various underwater archaeology projects, and includes an article on our Albanian Marine Science Expedition! (pp.58-60).  Check out the articles here: www.icua.hr/images/dokumenti/2/Bekic_ed_Submerged_Heritage_6_Web_Final.pdf

Article/ Project led by Peter B. Campbell , with a team composed of marine scientists and archaeologists working together with the Albanian Center for Marine Research, National Coastal Agency, Albanian Navy, and NGO Deep Blue Explorers. Photos by Peter, and Steven Lopez.

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For an insight into our sailing journey and expedition, check out my blog post.

Exploring Epirus

THE BALKANS

A place where the mountains kiss the seas. Soaring backdrops contour the distinct steep rocky shores of the Balkans. I have been lucky to explore the coastlines of Croatia, Montenegro, and more recently, their less visited neighbour, Albania. It is still relatively unknown and untouched… a beautiful country, rich in history. I was part of a team of international scientists on the “Albania 2016 Marine Science Expedition”, in search of ancient shipwrecks and artefacts along different sites in Albania, known in ancient times as Epirus.

CORFU STRAIT & ALBANIA

Just as ancient sailors did over 2000 years ago, we embarked on our expedition from the Greek island of Corfu, sailing across to Sarandë, on the Albanian Riviera, then northward through and beyond the Corfu Strait to Vlorë Bay. We sought temporary shelter along the way at Porto Palermo, where the Ali Pasha Castle lies. Before reaching it, we had to watch out for the inconspicuous reef that was hazardous to sailors throughout antiquity, known as the Devil’s Tongue. Below the surface rests the Joni Wreck, a large 4th century AD Roman shipwreck. As we navigated along this mountainous coast, we faced changing winds and choppy waters, so we continually adapted to nature’s whim. Along the largely harbourless Karaburun Peninsula, we caught sight of the distinct limestone-ringed rocky coastline known as the White Roads in antiquity. We anchored en-route, strapped on our dive gear and explored the seabed of Gramma Bay, a small natural haven where Roman forces landed, and Greek and Latin inscriptions of sailors are engraved on the cliff walls of the way, a sort of sailors’ ‘rock diary’.

We then set sail around the tip of the peninsula where it curves into Vlorë Bay, past the natural colour-changing border where the Adriatic and Ionian Seas merge. Along this stretch lies the Cave of the Illyrians, believed to have been a pirate hideout in the past. We explored threatened areas, finding evidence for ancient sea-level change and maritime trade. Our most exciting discoveries were large submerged remains at the fortified Roman port of Triport, proving to be far larger than previously believed, extending an additional 8 acres at least. It offered anchorage for ships on the sea and Narta Lagoon, linking ancient cities via major Roman roads and trade routes. On the return journey, we took the land route instead, driving south along mountainous winding roads through abundant national parks. We reached Lake Butrint, an inland lagoon linked to the Roman fortified colony and port Butrint, a key archaeological UNESCO World Heritage site in southern Albania. We carried out underwater cultural assessments of nearby areas, while enjoying evenings at our remote camp surrounding a fireplace in the company of scorpions and mosquitos, overlooking Corfu under a starry sky to the sound of crashing waves.

[excerpt from my ‘Snippets of a Nomadic Year: From South America to the Balkans‘ article published in F*Shift Magazine‘s Explorer issue, Oct 2016, pp. 40-41]

Note: Albania content edited by Steven Lopez, Travel Editor & Archaeologist for F*Shift Magazine, and Oh Snap Adventures! Blog (with M.Sc., specialising on Roman navigation in Albania).

Project directed by Peter B. Campbell, M.A (University of Southampton), Neritan Ceka (Albanian Institute of Archaeology), and Albanian National Coastal Agency.


“Expedition finds remains of fortified Roman port are much larger than previously thought”. Read more about our recent marine science expedition in Albania, featured on Physics News (Phys.org) and the see following blog post.


Exploring Albania’s maritime heritage. Photography: Steven Lopez (instagram: @eslopez128).

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Underwater Survey of Gramma Bay. Photography: Peter B. Campbell, Project Director
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Albania Marine Science Expedition team. Photography: Steven Lopez (instagram: eslopez128).